Type: Element

  • Custom Type to allow all of its methods to be used with any DOM element via the dollar function $.
  • These methods are also available on window and document.

Notes:

  • Internet Explorer fires element events in random order if they are not fired by Element:fireEvent.

Element Method: addEvent

Attaches an event listener to a DOM element.

Syntax:

myElement.addEvent(type, fn);

Arguments:

  1. type - (string) The event name to monitor ('click', 'load', etc) without the prefix 'on'.
  2. fn - (function) The function to execute.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

HTML:
<div id="myElement">Click me.</div>
JavaScript
$('myElement').addEvent('click', function(){
    alert('clicked!');
});

Notes:

  • You can stop the Event by returning false in the listener or calling Event:stop.
  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

See Also:

Element Method: removeEvent

Works as Element.addEvent, but instead removes the specified event listener.

Syntax:

myElement.removeEvent(type, fn);

Arguments:

  1. type - (string) The event name.
  2. fn - (function) The function to remove.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

Standard usage:

var destroy = function(){ alert('Boom: ' + this.id); } // this refers to the Element.
$('myElement').addEvent('click', destroy);
 
//later...
$('myElement').removeEvent('click', destroy);

Examples with bind:

var destroy = function(){ alert('Boom: ' + this.id); }
var boundDestroy = destroy.bind($('anotherElement'));
$('myElement').addEvent('click', boundDestroy);
 
//later...
$('myElement').removeEvent('click', destroy); // this won't remove the event.
$('myElement').removeEvent('click', destroy.bind($('anotherElement')); // this won't remove the event either.
$('myElement').removeEvent('click', boundDestroy); // the correct way to remove the event.

Notes:

  • When the function is added using Function:bind or Function:pass, etc, a new reference is created. For removeEvent to work, you must pass a reference to the exact function to be removed.
  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

Element Method: addEvents

The same as Element:addEvent, but accepts an object to add multiple events at once.

Syntax:

myElement.addEvents(events);

Arguments:

  1. events - (object) An object with key/value representing: key the event name, and value the function that is called when the Event occurs.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

$('myElement').addEvents({
    mouseover: function(){
        alert('mouseover');
    },
    click: function(){
        alert('click');
    }
});

Notes:

  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

See Also:

Element Method: removeEvents

Removes all events of a certain type from an Element. If no argument is passed, removes all events of all types.

Syntax:

myElements.removeEvents([events]);

Arguments:

  1. events - (optional) if not passed removes all events from the element.
    • (string) The event name (e.g. 'click'). Removes all events of that type.
    • (object) An object of type function pairs. Like the one passed to Element:addEvent.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

var myElement = $('myElement');
myElement.addEvents({
    mouseover: function(){
        alert('mouseover');
    },
    click: function(){
        alert('click');
    }
});
 
myElement.addEvent('click', function(){ alert('clicked again'); });
myElement.addEvent('click', function(){ alert('clicked and again :('); });
//addEvent will keep appending each function.
//Unfortunately for the visitor, there will be three alerts they'll have to click on.
myElement.removeEvents('click'); // saves the visitor's finger by removing every click event.

Notes:

  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

See Also:

Element Method: fireEvent

Executes all events of the specified type present in the Element.

Syntax:

myElement.fireEvent(type[, args[, delay]]);

Arguments:

  1. type - (string) The event name (e.g. 'click')
  2. args - (mixed, optional) Array or single object, arguments to pass to the function. If more than one argument, must be an array.
  3. delay - (number, optional) Delay (in ms) to wait to execute the event.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

// fires all the added 'click' events and passes the Element 'anElement' after one second
$('myElement').fireEvent('click', $('anElement'), 1000);

Notes:

  • This will not fire the DOM Event (this concerns all inline events ie. onmousedown="..").
  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

Element Method: cloneEvents

Clones all events from an Element to this Element.

Syntax:

myElement.cloneEvents(from[, type]);

Arguments:

  1. from - (element) Copy all events from this Element.
  2. type - (string, optional) Copies only events of this type. If null, copies all events.

Returns:

  • (element) This Element.

Examples:

var myElement = $('myElement');
var myClone = myElement.clone().cloneEvents(myElement); // clones the element and its events

Notes:

  • This method is also attached to Document and Window.

Object: Element.Events

You can add additional custom events by adding properties (objects) to the Element.Events Object

Arguments:

The Element.Events.yourProperty (object) can have:

  1. base - (string, optional) the base event the custom event will listen to. Its not optional if condition is set.
  2. condition - (function, optional) the condition from which we determine if the custom event can be fired. Is bound to the element you add the event to. The Event is passed in.
  3. onAdd - (function, optional) the function that will get fired when the custom event is added. Is bound to the element you add the event to.
  4. onRemove - (function, optional) the function that will get fired when the custom event is removed. Is bound to the element you add the event to.

Examples:

Element.Events.shiftclick = {
    base: 'click', // the base event type
    condition: function(event){ //a function to perform additional checks
        return (event.shift == true); // this means the event is free to fire
    }
};
 
$('myInput').addEvent('shiftclick', function(event){
    log('the user clicked the left mouse button while holding the shift key');
});

Notes:

  • There are different types of custom Events you can create:
    1. Custom Events with only base: they will just be a redirect to the base event.
    2. Custom Events with base and condition: they will be redirect to the base event, but only fired if the condition is met.
    3. Custom Events with onAdd and/or onRemove and any other of the above: they will also perform additional functions when the event is added/removed.
  • Since MooTools 1.3 this is a native JavaScript Object and not an instance of the deprecated Hash

Warning:

If you use the condition option you NEED to specify a base type, unless you plan to overwrite a native event. (highly unrecommended: use only when you know exactly what you're doing).

Built-in Custom Events

Event: mouseenter

This event fires when the mouse enters the area of the DOM Element and will not be fired again if the mouse crosses over children of the Element (unlike mouseover).

Examples:

$('myElement').addEvent('mouseenter', myFunction);

See Also:

Event: mouseleave

This event fires when the mouse leaves the area of the DOM Element and will not be fired if the mouse crosses over children of the Element (unlike mouseout).

Examples:

$('myElement').addEvent('mouseleave', myFunction);

See Also:

Event: mousewheel

This event fires when the mouse wheel is rotated;

Examples:

$('myElement').addEvent('mousewheel', myFunction);

Notes:

  • mouseenter and mouseleave events are supported natively by Internet Explorer, Opera 11, and Firefox 10. MooTools will only add the custom events if necessary.

  • This custom event just redirects DOMMouseScroll (Mozilla) to mousewheel (Opera, Internet Explorer), making it work across browsers.

See Also:

Object: Element.NativeEvents

This is an object with all known DOM event types, like click, mouseover, load, etc. Each event type has a value, possible values are 0 (undefined, null), 1, and 2.

Type 0 Events

By default it is undefined. In this case you can add events, but you should manually fire them.

Example:

element.addEvent('pizza', fn);
element.fireEvent('pizza', 'yum!');

The event is not actually added to the DOM, but is only registered in a JS object.

Type 1 Events

The second case is if the value is 1. This time the object is attached to the DOM. Usually by element.addEventListener, or element.attachEvent in older versions of IE. You can still use element.fireEvent('load') to manually fire events.

Type 2 Events

The final case is if the value is 2. This is the same as case 1. The only difference is that the event object, containing interesting data, is wrapped and normalized by event wrapper (DOMEvent). This is the most used variant, for mouse events (like click) and keyboard events.

The reason to differentiate between 1 and 2 is that 1 is usually used for events that don't have interesting data like: onload, onscroll, and onresize, or it's more performant. The latter two, for example, are fired frequently.

Adding unsupported events

Not all events are supported by MooTools' Element Events API because of edge use cases or new events supported by the browser. To add support for a native event, just augment the Element.NativeEvents object with the key and appropriate key value (use the above). For example to add popstate support in your application:

Element.NativeEvents.popstate = 2;
// Now element.addEvent('popstate', fn); will work everywhere

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